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Global Leadership Speaker and Premier Work-Life Balance Speaker
Speaking Information at (727) 467-0202 or e-mail info@fawngermer.com

Archive for August 2015

Spiritual Points

By all means, love what you do, and do it with pas­sion! But keep the stress of your work in perspective. It consumes so many people. I imagine that, when God looks at it, he sees we are spending a whole lot of en­ergy on something that is ultimately meaningless in a spiritual realm. We don’t get spiritual points for being good at our jobs — we get points for being good at our role in humanity. I’m sure God is happy if your job makes you happy, especially if you are developing your talents and helping others, but He probably isn’t too worried about how far you climb that corporate ladder or how well any given project turns out.

Your purpose on this earth is to develop as a human being. Love your work, enjoy every possible aspect of it, but don’t let it consume your opportunity to develop on a deeper human level. If past ups or downs in your job are getting to you, let them go. Do you think you’ll get scolded in the afterlife for a bad performance evaluation or some big project that didn’t go well? My guess is that God doesn’t care about any of that. So if He doesn’t, should you let it consume you?

I do think it matters when you hurt others to ad­vance yourself in your work because that is a character issue. Work gives us endless opportunities to define ourselves with character and integrity — or not. We can face our work with either greed or generosity. With selfishness or selflessness. And what we choose to do shapes and defines our purpose here on earth. Our work gives us a chance to test, confront, and experi­ence. Work is not a purpose, but it can be a vehicle to our purpose.

Valuable Learning Experience

Instead of getting lost in the drama of the mo­ment, step outside of it and see it for the valuable learning experience it can be. Whether you’re experi­encing anguish or exhilaration, victory or defeat, love or loss, the whole point of the lesson is the lesson itself, because it will teach you who you are.

We are here to live, connect, and grow. Winning in this realm means we must fill our time with meaning and purpose. There are so many moments of challenge and adversity that push us to define our character with inten­tion and mission.

You are a spiritual being having a human experience. Embracing that perspective is the ultimate personal reset.

Instead of seeing the intensity of the moment on a flat dimension of light/dark, happy/sad, win/lose, he said/she said, let yourself look at it from above. If you are a spiritual being having a human experience, why is this lesson playing out in this way? What are you supposed to learn?

Our work can become all-consuming and all-important, but when we take the larger, more spiritual perspective, we see that work can really distract us from our larger purpose of learning and growing.

Our work is not our sole purpose or our “soul” purpose for being on this earth.

By all means, love what you do, and do it with pas­sion! But keep the stress of your work in perspective. It consumes so many people. I imagine that, when God looks at it, he sees we are spending a whole lot of en­ergy on something that is ultimately meaningless in a spiritual realm. We don’t get spiritual points for being good at our jobs — we get points for being good at our role in humanity. I’m sure God is happy if your job makes you happy, especially if you are developing your talents and helping others, but He probably isn’t too worried about how far you climb that corporate ladder or how well any given project turns out.

Hang In There

I know what it feels like to experience that Sunday night anxiety before starting yet another week at a miserable job. It can look pretty bleak when you don’t see a way out of your frustration and stress. I promise you, there is a way out. Either you can find a way to make your job work for you, or you can ready yourself to pick up, make changes, and move on. But, hang in there!

It helps to know that you are in charge of your life.

Your relationship with your job — for better or for worse — is very similar to your relationships at home. You can’t pack up and leave because you are miserable parenting a teenager, so you have to find a way to make it work. And your relationship with your husband, wife, or partner also has its highs and lows.

You know what they say about a good relationship? It’s a lot of work. There are good days and bad days with your spouse or partner, with your screaming teenager, with your siblings and parents. It takes work to make those relationships work, and the same goes for your relationship with your job.

Workaholic

There is a huge difference between someone who is passionate about work and someone who is a workahol­ic. A workaholic can’t take a time-out because that break makes them uncomfortable. Off duty, they compulsively check their phones for e-mails, texts, or other work prompts. They pride themselves on working through their illnesses and never taking vacations.

Control is so important to them that they can’t let go or delegate to others because they are certain that anyone else will screw things up. They do all of this at the expense of liv­ing. Family is supposedly important, but when it comes to choosing a baseball game or recital over more work, they choose work. Or they take work with them so they can be present physically, but they’re definitely not there emotionally.

A Wayne State University study on the personality traits of workaholics found that a lot of workaholics have an unrealistic sense of self-importance regarding who they are and what they are accomplishing. They believe that, without their contribution, everything will fall apart at work. They also have an unrealistic need for perfection that makes them need to achieve it in order to view themselves as valuable or worthwhile.

Not much of a life, is it?

You always have the power to put your work in its place. Do a great job, but realize it is your job — not your world. Your identity has many facets, and it’s all right if you have one or two or ten other things that matter to you as much or even more than your title and your place of employment.

At some point you have to ask if you are giving work more or less of your life than it deserves. If something is out of whack, remember what Lisa said. Time is finite. If your work isn’t working for you, you can make changes that will still give you a rewarding career and an outside life. Reset it.

It’s your life. How do you want to spend it?